2D from 3D . . .

As I work on my movie, I am liking CTA 4 more and more. Why?

One of the advantages of doing 2D animation is that you are no longer concerned with the 3D as much and can concentrate on what needs to be rendered as you compose the scene in CTA 4.

After watching a few YouTube videos on creating 3D scenes efficiently as possible, I realized that part of my problem was trying to create scenes that are probably overly complicated. Although I have a 6Gb Nvidia card, my system chugs at times as I wait for iClone 7 to catch up.

This scene in the picture is 3.2Gb in iClone 7 and only 1.7Mb in CTA 4 and this is where the real power is. No longer do I render the whole animations in iClone, but I render out each piece, i.e., character, as PoPVideos that I import into CTA 4 as a Prop.

I’ve had several issues with the background of the imported popV file not being transparent when imported into CTA 4. So in order to render out the popV, hide everything except for a character, for example. Create the Prop in CTA 4 and it will import the animation without a problem. You might want to add something behind the import to make sure it is transparent. Why? So you don’t waste time if you can’t see through the import.

As you build the 2D animation from 3D rendered animations, you will be layering them so when you render the final animation in CTA 4, it will look great and it will be done relatively quick and you be able to make faster edits than doing it in 3D.

Of course, the only drawback is that you have to re-load a 3D scene to render out a PopVideo that wasn’t transparent, for example.

I have seen significant gains as I concentrate on the movie instead of waiting for the 3D to render a scene I might not like.

3112 . . . ds

The Bell Dimension (c) David J Soto CTA 4 Stage PNG
The Bell Dimension (c) David J Soto CTA 4 Stage PNG